Album Review: Abbey Road is iconic Beatles

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Album Review: Abbey Road is iconic Beatles

Abbey Road album cover with the addition of Tyler Parker

Abbey Road album cover with the addition of Tyler Parker

Amanda Piunno

Abbey Road album cover with the addition of Tyler Parker

Amanda Piunno

Amanda Piunno

Abbey Road album cover with the addition of Tyler Parker

Tyler Parker, Entertainment Writer

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Hello, I’m Tyler. The guy who will be reviewing albums and taking you on musical journeys for this school year. I will have a new album review up every Tuesday, alternating between classic and modern albums. I thought long and hard about what album I was going to review first, I knew it had to be influential and people had to at least recognize it, even if they haven’t heard it yet. So I figured, why not choose the 1969 album by The Beatles, Abbey Road?

Abbey Road is the last album The Fab Four ever recorded, their last triumph. The story goes, they had recently recorded what is known as “The Get Back Sessions.” During these sessions the band was in near ruin, fighting and walking out. Basically, they wound up recording the tracks in completely different rooms, and to add the cherry on the cake, they were working with a different producer than George Martin who had been with them since the beginning.

After these sessions, The Beatles decided they would try to record one more album, this being what would become Abbey Road. They got George Martin back to produce the album, and went back to a more classic way of recording. All of this said and done, they got along better and produced a classic. This classic is what I will be going through, track by track.

Starting off the album is track one: “Come Together,” written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. The track opens with an iconic bassline from Paul, the first lyrics being “Shoot Me” which can be taken as a reference to heroine from Lennon. This song actually got Lennon into legal trouble due to him taking a few lyrics from Chuck Berry’s 1965 song ‘You can’t catch me’.

Following shortly after on track 2: George Harrison’s “Something.” Depending on who you ask, it is said to be one of the best love songs ever written. In my opinion, it is a solid track but not my favorite. Harrison’s guitar work as usual is great and nothing much else can be said from me.

Onward from Something we go to track 3: “Maxwell’s Silver Hammer” written by John and Paul. Despite the song’s light hearted nature, it has a really dark subject matter. That being murder, by hammer. As we start the track, the light hearted nature of the lyrics and instruments might lead you to think this is an innocent song about a man named Maxwell and his lady going out to see a movie. You soon find out this is not the case when the lyrics go to describe him hitting her upon the head with a silver hammer. The song continues to follow the murderous antics of Maxwell until his eventual capture. Overall a fun dark track, but in my opinion not the best on the album.

Track 4: “OH! Darling” written by Paul and John, is a song about a man who has lost his lover. Paul’s vocals really shine on this track, in which he is frustrating frustration and anger through the character he is playing. Overall another solid track.

Following that is track 5: “Octopus’s Garden” written by Ringo Starr. This is a light hearted children’s song about a person who would like to be in an Octopus’s garden under the sea. Ringo provides happy light hearted vocals, and brightens the song up. Got to throw some love for Mr. Starr out here.

Track 6: “I Want You,” written by John and Paul. The lyrics of the song are mostly “I want you” with just a little variation. Later in the song, it picks up and gets very heavy with George’s guitar blaring until it finally cuts abruptly.

After this abrupt cut, acoustic guitar begins playing, leading us into the classic single, and track 7, “Here Comes The Sun,” written by George Harrison. It is a light-hearted iconic song, great use of mellotron, and overall, some great music.

Track 8: “Because,” written by John Lennon this song features amazing synced vocals from the band, for the most part it’s a short song, nothing much more I can say.

Following “Because” is tracks 9-16, or the ending Medley. Composed by Paul McCartney, this chunk of the album is all connected, and I will be treating it as one giant song. Starting it off is “You never Give Me Your Money” which starts with a light piano before Paul’s bass starts off. The song then gradually picks up until it fades into “Sun King,” a calm song and the second sun- themed song on the album. The song goes into French and eventually Ringo’s drums start up, taking us into “Mean Mr. Mustard,” which then transitions into “Polythene Pam,” a fast-paced exciting song which leads into “She Came In Through The Bathroom Window,” a song that picks up the pace and rock attitude even more. After all of that, the song fades into a soft piano sequence, starting off “Golden Slumbers,” a beautiful and emotional song that progressively picks up until the end, where it transitions into “Carry That Weight.” This song isn’t too special at first, until it transitions into a reprise of “You Never Give Me Your Money,” which lasts a bit and then pops into “The End.” Fittingly, this is the last Beatles song ever recorded . . .

That was Abbey Road. It really was difficult to put into words and I recommend you listen to it yourself, it really is worth the effort. It is a very iconic album and that is why I wanted to start with it. It isn’t The Beatles’ best work, but it is one of their most iconic. It has a special place in my heart and has helped me through some bad times. I’d give it a 9/10 if I had to rate it. I’ll be on the site next week for another review, see you then, Deer Valley!