Opinion: A Millenial’s Review of Voting

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Opinion: A Millenial’s Review of Voting

Abigail Bauman

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On November 6, I voted for the first time. Congratulations to all the other 2000s babies who also got to vote for the first time as well. If you just turned 18 this year and you didn’t vote, you are a buffoon. My voting experience was pleasant. I arrived at my designated voting location at 12:06 and waited in line for about 45 minutes. I entered the little church and showed my I.D, and got my ballot printed. I had to show them one form of state issued identification. Most people suggest bringing two forms of identification just in case. (Thank you, Mr. Foster, for that piece of advice!) I then went to work filling in my selected candidates.

Fun fact about voting that I was unaware of, you don’t fill in bubbles, you connect arrows, which is super weird. After you finish filling in your arrows, you pop your ballot into the designated envelope and put it in a weird box thing that they have there. Last but not least, you get a little sticker that says something along the lines of “I voted!” or “I voted today!” Which in my opinion is the best part of voting. Who doesn’t love free stickers?

Voting is one of the most important things you can do as an adult. Whoever is in charge can affect your everyday life. Not only does the government effect our everyday lives, they can affect our future as well. If you want to see change in the world, you need to act. Actions speak louder than words. Every paragraph you type about politics on your Facebook means nothing compared to actually getting out and voting. Trying to make a change is better than doing nothing at all.

A lot of people believe that their vote doesn’t matter but it absolutely does. Multiple times in the United State’s history, there have been elections won by one vote. That’s one person who probably don’t even know that they changed the course of history. Show up and vote, maybe you could be that one person who changed history by filling in a little arrow.

So this year I sincerely hope that if you’re 18 or older you went out and voted. Voting means that you actually tried to make a difference and you can feel good about that when you argue with your Aunt Karen about politics on Thanksgiving.

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About the Writer
Abigail Bauman, Editor in Chief

I’m a senior. I’m this year’s Editor in Chief. I’m an animal and music lover. I’m a huge fan of stingrays and dogs. I have two amazing nephews...

1 Comment

One Response to “Opinion: A Millenial’s Review of Voting”

  1. John Jiler on December 9th, 2018 8:27 am

    THE NOTORIOUS NINETEEN
    Dear Editor;
    Autumn is deepening, and seniors are thinking harder and harder about their next step. For many of us, your generation is the hope of the future. The Parkland high school shootings galvanized young people across the nation to passionately advocate for common sense gun laws. Now, as your attention turns to college, we want to turn our admiration into action.
    With the help of the Brady Center, the new Gabby Giffords consortium, Everytown for Gun Safety and the Columbia Scholastic Press Association, we’ve reached out to high school journalists across the country with our list of the NOTORIOUS NINETEEN—the states with dangerous, inadequate gun laws. Many of them condone the open carry of weapons on college campuses; others simply turn a blind eye to the potential for gun violence in their state. Our mission has been to make these places known to high school seniors, who we’re encouraging NOT to apply to college in…
    ALABAMA, ALASKA, ARIZONA, ARKANSAS, FLORIDA, GEORGIA, IDAHO, KANSAS, KENTUCKY, MISSISSIPPI, MISSOURI, MONTANA, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NORTH DAKOTA, OKLAHOMA, TEXAS, UTAH, WEST VIRGINIA, or WYOMING.
    Sadly, your state is on this list. You’re no doubt very proud of the place you live, and you should be. But the gun violence epidemic in this country has taken too many lives, and things must change. You can be part of that change, by encouraging your elected officials and your families and your friends to think about some serious questions. Should teenagers be able to order AR-15s through the mail? Should people with a history of mental illness be allowed easy access to guns? If you feel the answer to these questions is “no,” we all have a lot of work to do!
    Thank you for considering the publication of this letter in your newspaper. Good luck with your own decision about college, and have a safe and prosperous senior year!
    Best,
    John Jiler,
    Coordinator,
    Committee for Scholastic Action On Guns

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